TOM CLANCY’S RAINBOW SIX SIEGE

It’s out and here’s what you ought to know about the first new game in over seven years Ubisoft Montreal’s FPS title is now out, and it’s the first Rainbow Six since Vegas 2 which came out in...

It’s out and here’s what you ought to know about the first new game in over seven years

Ubisoft Montreal’s FPS title is now out, and it’s the first Rainbow Six since Vegas 2 which came out in 2008, and a successor to the now cancelled Rainbow 6: Patriots. Needless to say, the anticipation for this title, given the style of gameplay so specific to Rainbow Six titles (environmental destruction and co-op reliance), since its announcement at E3 2014 in June is understandable. Add to that the fact that any form of a campaign has been removed which just online play on offer, and it automatically stands out as a significant revamp of the series.

The tactical shooter lets you control one member of the counter-terrorist unit, the Rainbow team, better known as an operator. Different nationalities, perks, equipment and abilities; you can only pick one. The dissymmetrical playstyle involves you picking one operator, for example the operator ‘Smoke’, who detonates canisters of poison gas for AoE damage, or ‘Twitch’, who comes equipped with a drone that impels onto opponents an electrical impulse resulting in a stun, making many players take on preferred operators suited to their methods early on. In addition to this, there is also a ‘Recruit’, which is an operator whose equipment and gadgetry is customizable, based on player preference. With this design, it is imperative that players cooperate to take opponents down, because the diverse skillset aims for lockdowns and engagement, none of which can be achieved single handed.

Matches involve attackers and defenders, with each side allowed certain pre-set moves before the game begins. The attackers can send out a drone to target certain areas, check for opponents and gauge the environment, which is important to gain advantage given how much a region can change due to attacks, while defenders have added fortifications to areas they wish to keep safe from the attacking offense. Everything is breakable, and direct assaults can come through anywhere, include walls which can be breached, and windows which one can abseil through for a surprise attack. Matches are intense and purposefully within cramped spaces, with no player re-spawn and very short time frames to achieve targets so as to promote teamwork and tactical play.

You have a grand total of maybe four shots before you die (with no armour), so staying still for a spray would be ill advised. Given the kind of mutable environment you operate in, it would be better to run around, break through things, create slots in covers and go after your opponent in a nonlinear manner. In a way this makes it easier than any of its predecessors, at least in this regard, but it is as always one of the most realistic shooters made, and continues to stay true to what fans have loved best about it. It keeps you on your toes, forces you to take stock of the moves you require, depending on the side you’re on, what your teammates must be like to achieve success, and what strategy to deploy each time, even on the limited number of maps involved (there are 12). The game makes for excellent online co-op, and even if one is missing offline play, there is no doubt that the game makes for very satisfying play. The series retains the best of what fans remember.

Rainbow 6,Tom Clancy's,RS:S

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